MS House sends insurance bill back to Senate for reconsideration


The Mississippi House of Representatives is sending an insurance bill on prior authorizations for medical procedures back to the Senate for more work.

Senate Bill 2140, if passed, would establish an online portal for physicians to submit requests to insurance providers for procedures that require prior authorization within certain time frames for urgent and non-urgent medical procedures.

The law would also allow for physicians to receive authorizations from insurance companies faster.

The bill passed through the Senate last week without any changes and was amended Wednesday by the House Public Health and Human Services Committee.

Committee Chair Sam Creekmore, R, of Union County, moved to remove the amendment from the bill as well as establish slight changes through a strike-all amendment.

Mississippi state Rep. Sam Creekmore, R-New Albany, speaks Friday, Jan. 12, 2024, in the state Capitol in Jackson, after he was named the new chairman of the House Public Health and Human Service Committee. Creekmore presented a bill Thursday on prior authorization.Mississippi state Rep. Sam Creekmore, R-New Albany, speaks Friday, Jan. 12, 2024, in the state Capitol in Jackson, after he was named the new chairman of the House Public Health and Human Service Committee. Creekmore presented a bill Thursday on prior authorization.

Mississippi state Rep. Sam Creekmore, R-New Albany, speaks Friday, Jan. 12, 2024, in the state Capitol in Jackson, after he was named the new chairman of the House Public Health and Human Service Committee. Creekmore presented a bill Thursday on prior authorization.

“The strike-all fixes some technical issues,” Creekmore said. “The bill that I presented to Public Health yesterday is still the same. The intent is the same, there were some technical issues that I don’t have the capability to explain, but it was discovered after committee, and this just cleans that up.”

Creekmore told the Clarion Ledger after the vote that those changes included switching who physicians could speak with at insurance companies from other physicians who have knowledge of the type of care to whomever the insurance company chooses.

Other changes included extending the amount of time for insurance companies to approve urgent and non-urgent procedures from one to two days and from five days to seven days, respectively.

“These are ultimately to help keep the costs down and to speed up the overall process,” Creekmore said.

The bill passed as amended at a vote of 114-0 and will now be sent back to the Senate for final approval or for a conference committee if the chamber does not agree to the changes.

Grant McLaughlin covers state government for the Clarion Ledger. He can be reached at gmclaughlin@gannett.com or 972-571-2335.

This article originally appeared on Mississippi Clarion Ledger: MS House sends insurance prior authorization bill back to Senate



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